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  • blacktvfilmcrew
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  • blacktvfilmcrew@gmail.com

A Wrinkle In Time IS A Wrinkle In Time

When A Wrinkle In Time hit theaters last week, I was disappointed when I saw  articles comparing Wrinkle with Black Panther. Black Panther in its fourth week at the box office bested A Wrinkle In Time as it did every other film that came out that week. But A Wrinkle In Time doesn’t have to make as much money at the box office as Black Panther in order to be a good movie. A Wrinkle In Time doesn’t have to make $1 Billion at the box office to be a good movie. The only thing A Wrinkle In Time has to do is be a good movie.

When I thought about the people who were pitting A Wrinkle In Time against Black Panther, I remembered the readings from my Afro Studies class at Hampton University. Those classes taught me about the field negro and and house negro and the slave masters who pitted them against each other. I remembered the discussion in class about the animosity between light-skinned and dark-skinned people of African descent.

I remembered learning that people who pitted black people against each other always had an agenda–to divide and conquer.

But there will be no division here, not with these two movies, not with these two directors.

Ava Duvernay, who is the director of A Wrinkle In Time, is not in competition with Ryan Coogler who is the director of Black Panther.

They are colleagues, sister and brother in arms, two African Americans who are fortunate enough to helm the #1 and #2 movies in the entire United States.

That’s what they are. What they aren’t? They are not enemies. They are not two people routing for the other to fail. Sometimes people who write about the entertainment business but are not actually working as creators in the entertainment business forget a few things.

  1. Black creators who’ve worked so hard to make it believe in the success of their fellow black creatives.
  2. Black creatives know that with every success from a fellow colleague, it increases their chance of success.
  3. There are enough opportunities to go around.

If there is anything that I’ve learned helming Black TV Film Crew with a network of over 4,000 people it is this: Black creatives believe in each other. We do. We want you to succeed because if you succeed that means we can be successful.

I’m not going to call out the slave masters who pit Ava against Ryan. But I will say, “Go back to the plantation. Slavery is over.”

We will continue to support our creatives in every shape, form and fashion. And to keep it really, real Disney owns both of these movies. So, uh, there is no division, it is ALL DISNEY.